Forums Index Association for the Development of Pakistan
Discussion Forums
 
 ADP WebsiteADP Website   FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Private MessagesPrivate Messages   Log inLog in 

Dil Nutritional Program

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Forums Index -> Dropped
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Tarim Wasim



Joined: 28 Jan 2005
Last Visit: 17 Apr 2011
Posts: 160
Location: San Francisco
PostPosted: Tue Sep 20, 2005 10:22 am    Post subject: DIL Nutritional Program Reply with quote

We have received a proposal from DIL to fund a nutritional program at 3 of their schools affecting a total of 100 children. It includes a baseline assessment of need followed by teacher/parent training as well as provision of multivitamins and other supplements. While they've done a good job making a case for addressing malnutrition in Pakistan, I feel that we might want to have them complete the baseline study of the situation in their schools before we evaluate the project. Let me know what folks think.

-Tarim

ps: Note that the proposal does a good a job addressing most of our usual concerns (the need, monitoring, detailed budget). I suspect that this is driven not just by DIL's professionalism, but also the fact that they now have experience working with us.

--------------------

Program for Nutritional Awareness & Prevention of Disease

Objective:
To improve the health and nutritional status of children in 3 DIL supported schools in Rawalpindi District through a health education and awareness program for schoolteachers and mothers. The program will enhance their knowledge and skills in the areas of nutrition, hygiene and preventive health care for growing children.

Background and Justification:
Although the economy is growing, the health status of the majority of Pakistan’s population remains poor with almost one-third of it living below the poverty line. Marginalized and poorer communities have larger families and fewer resources and the pressure on food consumption leads to malnutrition in children affecting their capacity to learn and to grow intellectually, physically and emotionally. With over 540,000 under-five children dying every year, Pakistan has an under five mortality rate of 103 per 1000 births. 38% of under-five children are underweight, 37 % suffer from moderate to severe stunting and 12% from wasting. Immunisation rates are below 70%. Besides ethical reasons, providing good healthcare and nutrition to children are an investment in human capital formation. Healthier children grow up to be more productive. Without the early investment in nutrition and protection against disease through immunisation, poor children will not be able to break out of the vicious circle of poverty and will end up being poor parents, not only in economic terms but also intellectually and emotionally.

Methodology:
A one-year programme enlisting close involvement of the community. Problems will be identified and solutions proposed within the social, economic and environmental parameters existing in the area. After ascertaining the baseline factors such as availability of safe drinking water, access to healthcare, immunisation status, common diseases and nutritional status, the program will be implemented in the following stages:

1. Baseline assessment of approximately 200 children attending 6 designated schools (3 pilot, 3 control)
• Height, weight
2. Baseline assessment of randomly selected 20% of approximately 100 children attending the 3 pilot schools
• Personal hygiene – teeth, hair, nails, clothes
• Haemoglobin %
• Record of food consumed in one day
3. Provision of iron, calcium and multivitamins and anthelmenthics to the children approximately 100 children of the 3 pilot schools
4. Training of the teachers and mothers divided into 2 workshops conducted by a medical doctor.

Schedule to be followed for the 1st workshop:
Training for 10-15 teachers of the 3 pilot schools at the teacher training facility in Rawalpindi: 2 day course, 6 hours everyday. (12 hours)
Training for mothers of each pilot school at the school premises: 1 hour per week for 4 weeks for mothers of 3 schools: (12 hours). We will cover 2 schools a day, allowing for travel time.

Schedule for 2nd workshop:
4-hour refresher session for the teachers at the Rawalpindi facility.
1-hour refresher sessions at each school, for the mothers. (3 hours)

Other mid programme activities:
Hb% of the selected 20% children.
Anthelmenthics for all 100 children.
Height and weight of all 200 children from the 6 schools.

Curriculum:
Nutritional needs of growing children
Economical ways of procuring nutritional needs
Importance of hygiene, personal as well as environmental
Necessity of on time immunisations
Common diseases, their causes and prevention


After completion of the workshop the participants will:

Know the basic nutritional needs of growing children
Know ways of providing nutritious meals using available foodstuffs
Know the importance of personal and environmental hygiene
Know ways of maintaining a clean environment
Know ways of preventing common diseases


Monitoring and Reporting:
• Weight of all children of the pilot schools on a monthly basis
• Monthly surprise visits to the schools by DIL/ABES staff to check the hygiene of school environs, general appearance of the children and to see if the recommendations/ decisions taken during the training sessions are being followed


Evaluation:
Every 6 months:
• Height, weight of all students of the 6 schools
• Haemoglobin % of the selected 20 %


Time frame:
• Selection of schools per DIL schedule – 2 weeks after signing of Agreement.
• Baseline survey: Completed six weeks after signing of Agreement.
• Preparation of training material with translation: One month
• Tonics etc.: Begin as soon as baseline survey is completed.
• Training: Within 6 to 8 weeks of signing of Agreement. This may change slightly as we have to consider the convenience factor for the teachers and members of the community.

NB: All statistics taken from Human Development In South Asia 2004, The Health Challenge published by the Mahbub ul Haq Development Centre
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
M. Sajjad Haider



Joined: 23 Apr 2005
Last Visit: 18 Jul 2008
Posts: 55
Location: Pakistan
PostPosted: Mon Apr 17, 2006 2:19 am    Post subject: DIL - Nutritional Awareness Reply with quote

project has been adopted by the lahore chapter
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
M. Sajjad Haider



Joined: 23 Apr 2005
Last Visit: 18 Jul 2008
Posts: 55
Location: Pakistan
PostPosted: Mon Apr 17, 2006 7:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Does anyone know who, at DIL, is the contact person for this project?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
M. Sajjad Haider



Joined: 23 Apr 2005
Last Visit: 18 Jul 2008
Posts: 55
Location: Pakistan
PostPosted: Wed May 17, 2006 3:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Lahore Chapter discussed the DIL project in our meeting. Questions were posed to DIL, and answers to those questions were obtained. At this point in time, the project proposal has been analyzed and passed onto Phase 2. Since the entire funding for this project will come from the ADP general pool, all information regarding the project is attached and questions for DIL are welcome from all ADP chapters.

Attached are the Q&A with DIL so far and the project summary form.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Tarim Wasim



Joined: 28 Jan 2005
Last Visit: 17 Apr 2011
Posts: 160
Location: San Francisco
PostPosted: Sun Jun 04, 2006 12:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The challenge here is drawing a direct link between the awareness campaign and measurable impact, which is one of our criteria. We got over that hump in the First Aid training project because DIL had suggested there could be an improvement in class attendance once teachers are equipped to take care of common medical issues themselves. Unfortunately, we didn't see an increase in class attendance after the project. While that in itself does not mean there was no impact (attendance is driven by several factors - DIL attributed the post-project attendance decline to the harvest season), but it highlighted the difficulty of measuring results.

I worry that a general nutritional awareness program's impact will be extremely hard to measure. Thoughts?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Forums Index -> Dropped All times are (GMT -5:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
Page 1 of 1
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You cannot download files in this forum


ADP Forums © 2005 Association for the Development of Pakistan using php B.B. engine